Note As shown in the table, an American worker employed in Germany can only be covered by U.S. Social Security if he or she works for a U.S. employer. A U.S. employer includes a company organized under U.S. or state law, a partnership if at least two-thirds of the partners are based in the United States, a person residing in the United States, or a fiduciary company if all directors are based in the United States. It is also a foreign subsidiary of a U.S. employer when the U.S. employer entered into an agreement with the Internal Revenue Service, pursuant to Section 3121 (l) of the Internal Revenue Code, to pay Social Security taxes for U.S. citizens and residents employed by the subsidiary. On 31 January 2020, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (United Kingdom) left the European Union (EU).

Nevertheless, the United Kingdom continues to apply to European law for the time being. This is reflected in the eu-EU-UK withdrawal agreement, which came into force on 1 February 2020. Workers who are exempt from U.S. or foreign social security contributions under an agreement must document their exemption by obtaining a country coverage certificate that continues to cover it. For example, an American worker temporarily posted to the UK would need a SSA-issued coverage certificate to prove his exemption from UK social security contributions. Conversely, a UK-based employee working temporarily in the Us would need a certificate from the British authorities to prove the exemption from the US Social Security Tax. Agreements to coordinate social protection across national borders have been commonplace in Western Europe for decades. This is followed by a list of the agreements reached by the United States and the effective date of each. Some of these agreements were then revised; The date indicated is the date on which the original agreement came into force.

If you have any questions about international social security agreements, please contact the Office of International Social Security Programs at 410-965-3322 or 410-965-7306. However, do not call these numbers if you want to inquire about a right to an individual benefit. These objective rules include the following rules, which may not apply to any agreement reached by the United States: for the period following the end of the transitional period, the withdrawal agreement also provides provisional protection in social security and the protection of the legitimate trust of people who have already had transnational ties with the United Kingdom and EU Member States.